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Carrot Cake with Cashew Frosting - Whole Grain, Macrobiotic, Vegan & Gluten Free

Carrot Cake with Cashew Frosting

Oh my goodness.

WAY back when this year, I made a delicious treat for Easter. It was a super dense, hearty carrot cake, made with a variety of healthier baking ingredients. I topped it off with a delicious lemony cashew frosting. This recipe will create a cake that is almost like baked oatmeal, so please expect a super dense, hearty cake - not a fluffy, light, blood sugar crashing kind of treat.

If you want to have a super duper healthy "I can eat this for breakfast" kind of cake, or simply a healthier way to indulge, please give the following recipe a shot and let me know what you think. Personally, I was mega pleased with it, and I had to stop myself from just spooning the icing directly into my mouth.
 

Carrot Cake

Ingredients

DRY

  • 2 cups regular rolled oats
  • 1 cup gf oat flour (can sub any other flour!)
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
  • 2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp cloves
  • pinch sea salt
  • sprinkle of cardamon

WET

  • 1 - 398 ml can pumpkin puree

  • 1/4 cup shredded coconut (can leave out if you want, but I'd replace with some sunflower seeds perhaps)

  • 1 small container of applesauce (about 1/4 cup)

  • 1/4 cup almond milk (or other milk)

  • 1/4 cup oil of choice (I used avocado, but you could use any veggie oil)

  • 2 medium carrots grated

  • 1/4 cup maple syrup (makes a very minimally sweet cake! you could double or triple this amount if you'd like it to be more sweet).

  • 2 tsp vanilla

  • Optional: 1/4 cup raisins, grated or diced apple

Instructions

  1. Set oven to 350F.
  2. Mix dry ingredients together in one bowl.
  3. Mix wet ingredients together in a separate bowl. I whisked it all together with a fork.
  4. Grease a pyrex dish ( I used an 11x7 one, greased with coconut oil).
  5. Add dry to wet, and mix together. Pour into pyrex, and smooth with a spoon.
  6. Bake for 75 mins.
  7. Cake will firm up more once cooled. The consistency of this cake will be a LOT like baked oatmeal.

Lemon Cashew Icing

Ingredients

  • 1.5 cups soaked cashews, drained and rinsed (soak for a couple of hours on counter)

  • Juice of 1 whole lemon.

  • 2 tbsp melted coconut oil

  • 3 tbsp maple syrup

  • splash of vanilla

  • a bit of water to thin if necessary

Directions

  1. Blend all ingredients until smooth and creamy... it seems to get creamier the longer you blend it. You can add a splash more of water or maple syrup if you like, or try adding in a couple of soaked dates instead of maple syrup.
  2. Place frosting in fridge and let firm up a bit while cake is cooling.
  3. Once cake is completely cool, slather it in the icing, and keep in the fridge until serving!
  4. I decorated mine with some veggies and lemon zest :)

I personally think the cake tasted even better on the second and third days. Happy Eating!

MacroTreatFriday (MTF): Pumpkiney, pumpkin, pumpkin!

Hi there sweet friends,

If you read anything related to food, no doubt you've been swarmed lately with pumpkin everything. Drinks, treats, soups, casseroles, you name it. I can't really say I'm that sad about it. I do love pumpkin in cooking and in baking. I use pumpkin year round, but there is something extra lovely about it, at this time of year.

So, without further ado, this Macro Treat Friday post is a Dainty Pig round-up of all things to do with pumpkin, that I have posted on the blog over the years.

MTF: Dainty Pig Macrobiotic Pumpkin Recipe Round-up

Get your oven mitts out, crank up the music, and put your apron on :)

ALL of these treats are vegan, whole-food based and use natural ingredients. Most are gluten free friendly, and are in tune with Macrobiotic principles.

 

Dainty Pig Pumpkin Pie

RECIPE HERE

Crustless 10 Minute Macro Pumpkin Pie

pumpkinpie2.jpg

RECIPE HERE

Chocolate Chip & Pecan Pumpkin Oat Cookies

RECIPE HERE

Baked Oatmeal Pumpkin Muffins

RECIPE HERE

Pumpkin Pudding / Custard

RECIPE HERE

Easiest Pumpkin Spice Cookies Ever

RECIPE HERE

Pumpkin Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies

RECIPE HERE

Pumpkin Oatmeal Carrot Cake

RECIPE HERE

And, I also have a whole bunch of tips and tricks for selecting winter squash, the differences in the types, how to perfectly bake squash every time, and some recipes using all kinds of winter squash in your meals.

Winter Squash How-To Guide

CLICK HERE for TIPS & WINTER SQUASH RECIPES

 

Also, I am super happy to announce that I'll be teaching another class next week, Friday the 26th, at Templed Mind, on Macrobiotic Sweets - finding sweetness within the Macro lifestyle, and how to make some tasty treats - great tips for the upcoming holidays. Class info is HERE. Hope to see you there!

What's your favourite PUMPKIN treat?

Happy day, weekend, baking, life, you name it.
Sending some love your way.

xo jess
 

 

 

MacroTreat Friday: Macrobiotic Friendly Apricot Berry Crisp

Happy Friday friends.

I've got a sweet, tangy, tart yet comforting summer fruit crisp for YOU.

Because I love you!
And I love summer fruit :)

MTF: Lemony Apricot Berry Crisp

Vegan, Macrobiotic Friendly, Quick & easy to prepare.

This recipe is very forgiving. Use what you have. Play around with the amounts. As you can see the amounts I've provided are pretty vague. I wanted a crisp that was very light and tart and fresh, so it doesn't have much fat or sugar compared to regular recipes. If you want something a little richer, add in a bit more oil or sugar, and you're good to go :)

Ingredients

  • 1 small pint of a more tart berry (I used red currants). Feel free to use strawberries, cherries, or blackberries as well.
  • About 2 cups, of blueberries (I used josta berries from the market)
  • about 6 fresh apricots, cut into sixths
  • Juice of half a lemon + zest (optional)
  • coconut oil - about 4 TBSP total (or other oil / fat of choice)
  • 1 cup flour of choice (I used spelt flour)
  • 2 cups rolled oats
  • 1/4 to 1/3 cup granulated sugar of choice (maple sugar, coconut sugar etc), divided between filling and topping
  • dash of cinnamon
  • pinch of salt
  • almond milk or cold water, about 1/4 cup

Directions

  1. Heat oven to 350F.
  2. Rub some oil all around on a glass pyrex dish ( I used a 13" x 9" one)*
  3. Wash all fruit, cut up the apricots.
  4. Spread the fruit over the bottom of the pyrex dish.
  5. Sprinkle in about 2 - 4 TBSP of sugar, depending on how tart you like your crisp, and how tart your berries are. Add in a pinch of sea salt, the lemon juice, and stir around so everything gets coated. **
  6. In a separate bowl, mix flour, oats, and a few tablespoons more of sugar, and a dash of cinnamon. Using a fork, or your hands, crumble in a few heaping tablespoons of coconut oil. [If using other oil, then just mix in with a fork].
  7. Add in just enough almond milk or cold water to form a crumbly wet dough.
  8. Using your hands, grab chunks of the dough and crumble evenly over the the fruit.
  9. Bake at 350F for at least 30 minutes, but up to an hour - checking for when the fruit is bubbling around and edges, and the top is golden. I left mine in for about 45 minutes.
  10. Remove from oven and let cool. If the fruit seems liquidy, don't worry - mine firmed up as it cooled. We kept the leftovers in the fridge, and the next morning they were GOOD. Yum!

NOTES:
* You can definitely use a smaller baking dish, just be warned it may take a bit longer to cook at it will be a bit deeper
** Feel free to add in a tablespoon or two of flour to the fruit, or another starch of choice, if you want it to "gum up" a bit more.

You may want to serve it with some vegan vanilla icecream for a treat...or top it with more fresh berries the next morning (as I did) for a delicious summery breakfast.

Enjoy!! <3

Macro Monday: Grain Coffee

Hey Friends,

Today's post is short and simple, and all about grain coffee. Grain Coffee, also called coffee substitute, is made from roasted and ground grains/nuts/fruits instead of from coffee beans.
I've tried quite a few, and while none of them taste like real coffee, they can be quite enjoyable as a thing in and of themselves.

MM: Grain Coffee

Grain coffee is often used as a coffee substitute - it can be a way to help ease off of coffee, if you are trying to give it up. I do enjoy a bit of real coffee of course, but especially in the evenings if I'd like something warm and cozy, sans caffeine, I often make tea, or a delicious hot grain coffee drink.

The grain coffees all vary widely in taste. Some are made with roasted acorns, figs & other nuts. Most have barley and chicory in there too. And often they include dandelion root. I have included a bunch of information and links below to my top 4 favourite grain coffees.

[Please note: the following links use my iherb discount code, which will give you $10 off your first order, and some points for me - use it if you like, or not :) thanks friends].

#1 Favourite Grain Coffee - Dandy Blend

I really enjoy Dandy Blend! I buy mine online, because it is much cheaper than I've seen it in stores...hopefully one day prices will drop in store.

I like Dandy Blend because it is gluten free, and has a very nice taste - it blends really easily. The ingredients are: extracts of roasted barley, rye, chicory root, dandelion root and sugar beet. It is not sweet, despite the inclusion of sugar beet - all the sweetness disappears during roasting. 

I usually just add some boiling water to mine, and sometimes I put in some almond milk and cinnamon, or even a touch of rice syrup or maple syrup, if you want something a little sweet.

#2 - Dandy Joe

I wrote about these guys awhile ago here. This Dandelion coffee I purchased in Edmonton. It is produced locally, in Alberta. I bought it at Wild Earth grocery on 99th street, but later on saw that they had a stall at the Farmer's market in Old Strathcona.

For this kind of Dandelion Coffee, I'd recommend following their advice, and brewing it in a coffee maker of choice. It comes out fairly clear (compared to the Dandy Blend), and pretty strong, as you brew it and don't simply stir it in. I still have some left (yay!) and when I do use it, I often make it into a Dandelion Latte. They also make some other versions that include medicinal herbs etc. For all my non-Edmonton based readers, I'm not so certain if they will ship or not, but here is a link to their Market Stall profile, with an email address below. I bet if you smile pretty they'll sent you some :)

#3 Organic Caf-Lib

This is a new to me product that I recently picked up at the store because I was out of Dandy Blend ;) It is a straight up grain beverage made with chicory, barley & malted barley.

I'm really happy with it so far. I especially like that it is instant like Dandy Blend and does not require brewing. This makes it a great quick option. You simply add either hot water, or hot milk of choice, stir, and you're ready to go.

I especially like it because it's fairly common to find, even at regular grocery stores in my area, and is under $10. <3


#4 Teeccino

This is probably the most popular grain/nut/fruit coffee substitute out there. I bet it's because of all the delicious flavours they have.

Most of these guys' blends have carob, dates & figs in there, which provide a really decadent and nice sweet flavour. Again, just like Dandy Joe, this is a grain coffee that needs to be brewed in a coffee machine of your choice.

There are tons of flavours to choose from such as: mochavanilla nut, and regular old french roast. My favourite (please note that I've only tried a few so far), is hazelnut. They seem to be continually coming out with new flavour and products :)

Now I think it's time to make a grain-coffee latte :)

 Dandelion Latte made with Dandy Joe, Almond Milk, cinnamon and a drizzle of brown rice syrup &lt;3

Dandelion Latte made with Dandy Joe, Almond Milk, cinnamon and a drizzle of brown rice syrup <3

Have a happy fun-drink kinda week <3
See you on Friday for MacroTreat Friday!
xoxo Jess

 

MacroTreat Friday: Macrobiotic Fruit Tart

Hi Friends,

Phew - it has been a bit crazy busy these past few weeks. I haven't been able to spend nearly as much time in the kitchen baking, as I'd like to. So, today's treat is a link to a previous recipe I posted.

It is one of my favourite desserts I've ever made, and all the berries and fruit leave me dreaming of summer, which doesn't feel so far away <3

MTF: Macrobiotic Fruit Tart

Check out the post HERE to get the recipe.

I have included multiple crust options, including a gluten free version, and multiple filling options. You can put on the glaze, or not. You can line the crust with some dark chocolate for a more decadent treat - or not.
 

Seriously, so good.

Go for it, make it today. Enjoy it all weekend. <3

Lots of love to you friends.

See you back here on Monday.
xo J

 

MacroTreat Friday: Macrobiotic Baked Oatmeal Pumpkin Muffins

Yum yum yum.

That's about all I've got to say about these guilt-free super healthy treats. Seriously, it's just like oatmeal...that's been baked...in a muffin cup.
 

MTF: Macro Baked Oatmeal Pumpkin Muffins

pumpkinoatmuffin53-2.jpg

[JUNK FREE]: Flour Free, Gluten Free, Refined Sugar Free, Pumpkin Oatmeal Muffins with no leaveners added!

Makes 12 medium - large sized muffins.

Ingredients

Wet

  • one 398ml/15oz can of pumpkin puree
  • 1 cup almond milk (or water, or rice or soy milk)
  • 1/4 cup pure maple syrup
  • 2TBSP oil (sesame, grapeseed, avocado, olive or liquid coconut oil)
  • 1/4 cup apple sauce (I used one of those little snack sized containers)

Dry

  • 1.5 cups rolled oats (use GF oats here if you like)
  • 1.5 cups steel cut oats, quick cooking steel cut oats, or more rolled oats (again, GF if desired)
  • 1 TBSP chia seeds
  • 2 TBSP ground flax seeds
  • pinch of sea salt
  • 1 TBSP cinnamon
  • 1 tsp ground ginger
  • 1/4 tsp cloves
  • 1/4 tsp nutmeg
  • 1 cup sunflower seeds
  • 1/2 cup other mix ins - currants, raisins, cocoa nibs, chocolate chips, more nuts or seeds
pumpkinoatmuffin01.JPG

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 375F.
  2. Mix wet ingredients together in a bowl, using a fork.
  3. In another bowl, mix dry ingredients, except for the sunflower seeds and mixi-ns.
  4. Add wet to dry, mixing with your fork.
  5. Add in the sunflower seeds and whatever other mix-ins you so desire. (I divided the batter up and left 1/3 with only sunflower seeds, 1/3 I added in some currants, and 1/3 I added in some chocolate chips).
  6. Spoon into muffin liners, or a greased muffin tin. Don't be shy - fill them right up to the top, even piling it on and rounding with a spoon.
  7. Bake 25-30 minutes, until firm and a toothpick comes out clean (they'll firm up more as they cool too).
  8. Let cool and serve!
pumpkinoatmuffin39-1.jpg
pumpkinoatmuffin41-1.jpg

These treats were inspired by an overflowing pantry, and my flour free spicy pumpkin ginger cookies that are seriously the easiest cookies ever :)

Have a great weekend lovely friends.
I hope you enjoy some oatmeal in muffin form.
T & I sure do :)

xo Jess

 

MacroTreat Friday: Macrobiotic Raspberry Almond Torte

Hey Guys,

This week I didn't manage to fit any baking in, so instead I finally got around to posting a recipe & photo from a few summers ago. It was amazingly delicious, and T just saw the photo and said "oh yeah, that was good, you should make it again" - so maybe I'll just have to, now that I have the recipe easily accessible.

MacroTreat Friday: Raspberry Almond Torte

IMG_3344-2 with text.jpg

This cake is a macrobiotic-ified, vegan, & gluten free (optional) version of a classic recipe in my house. I have always loved the combination of raspberries & almonds, and this cake was the one I requested for my birthday most often. This version is much lighter on the sweetness, using the raspberry jam for most of the sweet taste. The crust is a bit less thick than the original  version, but it is still super tasty. I made this with an oat flour/brown rice flour crust, and also with a spelt flour crust - both versions are delicious. This is wonderful as a treat, or as a treat breakfast :)

Ingredients

  • 4 Tbsp maple syrup or brown rice syrup should work too
  • 150 g oil ( like most of my crust recipes, I did a mixture or olive oil and grapeseed oil. Sunflower oil would work well here too - feel free to sub in 50 - 100 g applesauce for some of the oil)
  • zest of 1 whole lemon
  • optional: tiny squeeze of lemon juice
  • pinch of salt
  • knife tip of ground cloves - I'd guess around 1/4 tsp
  • optional 1 tsp baking powder (I used it once with, once without, and both worked just fine).
  • 230 g flour (I'd recommend spelt flour here, or for a gluten free version use a mix of oat flour & brown rice flour - the crust will still work, it'll just be a bit more crumbly. I'd bet you could do it with only oat flour as well)
  • 200 g grated or ground almonds (not super fine almond flour, keep a bit of a texture - you can try doing this in a blender, but I have a hand nut grinder I use for this).
  • 250 g fruit only raspberry jam
  • small bit of soymilk or oil for brushing on top
IMG_3348.jpg

Directions

  1. Set oven to 350F
  2. Mix maple syrup & oil together, and then add all the remaining ingredients (except for jam) together to form a ball (knead with your hands). If dough is too dry, add a tiny bit of water, and if it's too wet, add a bit more flour.
  3. Chill dough in freezer for about a 1/2 hour.
  4. Remove dough from freezer, and set aside 1/3 of it for the lattice topping.
  5. Lightly oil the bottom of a tart pan (mine was a tart pan with a removable bottom, but my family usually uses a spring form pan). You can place a piece of parchment paper cut out into a circular shape on top of the oiled bottom if you wish, as well.
  6. Press remaining 2/3 of the dough into the bottom of the tart pan. (alternatively you could also roll out the dough between parchment and drape into the bottom of the pan)
  7. Spread raspberry jam on top of the dough in the pan.
  8. Roll out the rest of the dough to 2 mm thickness. Cut into strips, and lay them, crisscrossing your way across the top of your torte.
  9. Lightly brush the lattice with a bit of soymilk or oil (or both mixed together).
  10. Bake at 350F for 30-35 mins. Watch to make sure top doesn't burn. You can always lower the heat in that case, or cover in foil if necessary.
  11. Let cool & serve.
IMG_3373-1.jpg

Enjoy, my sweet friends. <3 <3 <3

MacroTreat Fridays: Macrobiotic Apple Cinnamon Millet Muffins

Who doesn't love a good muffin?

I mean, there's just something wonderful about sitting down to a delicious muffin and a warm cup of tea for breakfast. Especially on a chilly day.

Warning: these breakfast muffins ain't for sissys. Just like all my treats, these guys are vegan and made with real whole food. They are definitely less decadent than last weeks' treat as they are super dense & hearty and sweetened only with apples. So, if you're wanting a cake disguised as a muffin for breakfast, these aren't the ones for you. If you're wanting something super filling and nutritious, then good for you, you just found 'em.

IMG_4706-2.jpg

MacroTreat Fridays: Macrobiotic Apple Cinnamon Millet Muffins

These are super-duper healthy, and taste like it too - in a good way. Completely whole grain, no leaveners, and no sweeteners - just the wonderful taste of apples and cinnamon, surrounded by hearty-whole grain goodness, with a surprising nutty crunch of millet. They are almost like dense apple energy bar biscuits (yah, I don't know, it makes sense to me). For suggestions, substitutions (including a no-millet option), and notes, please check down below after the directions.

IMG_4726-1.jpg

Makes 12 muffins.

Ingredients:

  • 2.5 cups whole grain sprouted spelt flour (regular whole spelt or wheat flour works well too)*
  • 3/4 cup millet (uncooked, but toasted, see directions below) *
  • 2 tsp cinnamon
  • 3 pinches of sea salt
  • 3/4 cup apple sauce
  • 1/4 cup oil of choice - I used grapeseed and olive oil
  • 1 cup water *
  • 2 medium apples, diced (pear would be lovely too!).
IMG_4712-1.jpg

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350F.
  2. Combine flour, salt, and cinnamon.
  3. Rinse millet, then drain completely in a sieve. Once drained, toast millet in a pan on the stove-top, over low-heat, stirring frequently, until it's golden brown and smells wonderful (around 5 mins). Remove from heat.
  4. After millet has cooled slightly, add to the rest of the dry ingredients.
  5. Dice the apples into small chunks. You can leave the skin on :)
  6. In a separate bowl, combine the apple sauce, oil, and water.
  7. Add wet to dry, and mix until just combined. I used a fork to mix it together.
  8. Fold in the apples.
  9. Pour into muffin liners, or into a greased muffin pan.
  10. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until the tops are golden brown and a toothpick comes out clean. I let mine bake for 30 mins, as I preferred them to be a bit extra cooked :) Let cool until ready to serve.
IMG_4744-1.jpg

*NOTES:

  • Like I said earlier, these muffins are not very sweet at all...so feel free to add in some maple syrup in place of part of the water- even just a few tablespoons are really nice. I'd recommend 1/4 cup maple syrup 3/4 cup water  if you are new to whole-grain baking or this way of eating, or if you are serving it to regular eaters.
  • The millet definitely has a very noticeable taste & texture in these muffins. It is pretty crunchy, when added in this way, kind of like a seed. So, feel free to replace the millet entirely if you are unsure about it. I would recommend just adding in more flour in place of it (I've successfully done this), or you could try oat flakes as well. Another possibility is replacing the crunchiness of the millet, with sunflower seeds :)
  • If you think these are going to be too dense for you, then you can easily lighten these bad boys up a bit, by using half whole wheat pastry flour, or light spelt flour. You can also add in a teaspoon of baking powder too, if that suits your fancy.
  • Feel free to spice these up a bit too - ginger and nutmeg are amazing with apples or pears, and if you are using pears, cardamon is amazing <3
  • I think these taste better the next day! They are super quick and easy to make, so throw them in the oven the night before, and let them cool on a wire rack overnight on the counter. They'll be ready & waiting for you in the morning!
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I enjoyed mine for breakfast, cut in half, and spread with some almond butter.

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Delicious. Delightful. And a dreamy way to kick off the weekend.
xoxo J


Macro Monday: A Macrobiotic Staple...Miso Soup

Hi Guys,

Happy Monday. Can you believe January is already more than half over? Time flies!

Today's post is about one of the top Macrobiotic Staples.

MM: Miso Soup

 Barley Miso at Rebar &lt;3

Barley Miso at Rebar <3

I get asked about miso a lot. I know, kinda weird, right? But so is miso. I think it often freaks people out a little...especially when they hear the words "fermented" and "bean paste." And then they think of this tub just sitting there, in the back of their fridge, and being not sure what the heck to do with it. So I hope this helps!

 

What is Miso?

Well, as I said, it is a traditional Japanese fermented bean/grain paste, dating back to China (likely) 2500 years ago, used most often for seasoning soups.

It is most commonly made from combining soybeans, sea salt, and the starter koji (usually the fungus aspergillus oryzaea ), and mixed with grains such as rice or barley. It is fermented from 3 months up to 3 years. The variation in fermentation lengths, and the different beans or grains used, allows for there to be an amazing variety in kinds of miso, each one with a differing taste ranging from sweeter to more salty.

Miso is sold as a paste, often in plastic tubs or glass jars, in the cool section of the grocery store. You want to make sure you are purchasing miso that does not have preservatives in it, and that has been actually fermented, not simply filled with chemicals or artifical ingredients.

Miso paste can be added to soups, sauces, desserts and whatever else your heart desires, to add an amazing depth of flavour.

 

Health Benefits

Miso is extremely enzyme rich and is great for the immune system, which is perfect during the flu season. It also has a plethora of other health & healing benefits, including:

  • It is a good source of plant derived B vitamins, especially B12, which is very important and more difficult for vegetarians to get.
  • Along with other traditionally fermented products (like real sauerkraut), miso is a wonderful source of natural digestive-friendly good bacteria. It can help balance & restore beneficial probiotics to the intestines.
  • Miso is teeming with all the essential amino acids your body needs to function properly.
  • Miso is very alkalizing, which is what we want, as diseases flourish in acidic conditions, and cannot survive in alkaline conditions.
  • It can help to stimulate your digestive system and get things moving along
  • Due to the dipilocolonic acid in miso, it can help your body remove any accumulated heavy metals, and can help protect from radiation
  • Miso is a great source of manganese, copper & zinc, along with other amazing antioxidants.

 

How to Use It

While there are many different things you can make with miso, I want to focus today on the basic miso soup.

It is actually not so basic, as depending on the kind of miso paste, and the ingredients such as root veggies and/or noodles and/or protein such as tofu, you can create a hearty filling soup, or a very light simple soup to accompany any meal.

Some things to keep in mind:

  • You do NOT want to boil the miso paste - this will destroy the beneficial enzymes and good bacteria. It is therefore best added at the end, after all the veggies or whatever else are done boiling, and the stove temperature is lowered so your soup is just lightly simmering.
  • It is best to mix a few spoons of miso with some warm water in a separate bowl, until it has more of a sauce consistency, before adding it into your pot. This will prevent it from simply being one giant chunk in your soup :)
  • Please note: miso is fairly salty...it's probably best to not have more than 2 tsp per person, per day.
  • There are many kinds of miso (I read 1300 types!), and some are better at different times of the year:
    • Heavier miso types like straight soybean (hatcho miso) or darker rice miso in the winter
    • Barley (mugi miso) is great for a more year-round soup.
    • White miso (shiro miso) has a sweeter flavour and works better in dressing, sauces, and desserts.

 

Recipe for a Simple Veggie Miso Soup

Serves 3-4

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups water
  • 1 inch piece of wakame, soaked in 1 cup water (keep the water to add to the soup)
  • 4 heaping teaspoons miso paste (I enjoy brown rice, barley or a new favourite is adzuki bean miso)
  • 1-2 tsps of sesame or toasted sesame oil
  • Veggies of your choice! Here's a recent combo I really enjoyed: few inches of thinly sliced daikon, a couple leaves of chinese cabbage or bok choy, about 1/4 of an onion or leek, and a few slices of green onion for garnish. {carrots and shitake are also lovely}
adzuki bean miso.JPG

Directions

  1. Soak wakame in about 1 cup of water, until softened (around 10 minutes).
  2. Wash and rinse all veggies. Cut the daikon pieces into half circles (moons), thinly chop the leek or onion, and thinly slice the cabbage or bok choy.
  3. Heat the oil in the bottom of a saucepan, and brown the onions or leek with a teeny tiny bit of sea salt, adding a bit of water if necessary, to prevent burning.
  4. Add in the daikon slices & the cabbage or bok choy stems, stirring for a few minutes until slightly sauteed.
  5. Chop up the soaked wakame.
  6. Add the 3 cups water, and the wakame soaking water to the pot, and bring to boil.
  7. Add the wakame, and let the veggies simmer until tender, between 5-10 minutes. Add in the finely chopped bok choy leaves closer to the end of that time frame, as they only need a few minutes to soften.
  8. Scoop out your miso paste, and mix with a tiny bit of water in a cup or bowl, until it is all dissolved and runny.
  9. Lower the temperature until the soup is barely simmering, and whisk the miso in. Alternatively, you can even remove the pot from the heat completely, and then whisk the miso in.
  10. Let it cook for a few minutes, until you see "clouds" appear. The miso will kind of puff up to the surface, like clouds, and then you'll know it's done.
  11. Throw on some green onion slices if desired, and serve.

*This miso will not be what you are used to getting at sushi restaurants...that stuff is often instant miso. It will have more of a texture. If you do not like the small bits of grain/bean chunks from the miso paste (most people don't mind), you can actually whisk your miso through a strainer like so:

More miso recipes to come in the weeks to follow :)

If you have any questions, or a favourite miso recipe to share, don't hesitate to comment or email me!

Enjoy, and may this week be nurturing, comforting, and healing for you, my friends.

xoxo Jess